Back to Blogs

All Things Considered: Preferred Pronouns & Names on Resumes

  • Publish Date: Posted 3 months ago

The job search is an anxiety-producing process on its own. However, navigating issues of gender and identity can make the journey even more daunting.


Choosing whether to include your preferred pronouns or name can be an overwhelming decision for many job seekers. 


We’ve gathered the most common questions on this subject and their respective answers to help job seekers make the best decision for their needs.


However you identify, here’s what you should consider:

Yes. The answer is simple. It is perfectly fine to include your preferred name and pronouns on a resume. A resume is not a legal-standing document by any means.


The only legal matter you should be concerned about is using your legal name, if different from your preferred name, during the application process for background checks. Employers need your official name of record to perform audits of this nature. 

Including your preferred pronoun is a personal choice-there is no right or wrong answer.

However, there is much to consider when deciding to include your preferred pronouns on a resume. Inclusivity at an employer might be important to you. Some job seekers might want to present this information to promote and normalize gender diversity. Leading with your pronouns may also help filter out companies who aren’t as inclusive during your job search. 

It’s relatively simple to include your preferred pronouns on your resume. You can add them either next to or under your name in the header of your resume. If you prefer not to include it on your resume, there’s always the option to have it in your cover letter under your signature.


When it comes to listing a preferred name on a resume, simply list it. You can also take the route of listing a first initial, followed by a preferred name. Some people also provide their selected names in quotes, i.e., N. Ryder Jones or Nathan “Ryder” Jones.

Clarifying your gender identity and preferred name ahead of interactions with hiring managers will give you additional comfort going into an interview by reducing the probability that someone will misgender you.

Including your preferred terms of address also helps promote workplace inclusivity. However you identify, sharing your pronouns and preferred name encourages and educates others. More awareness around gender diversity moves society one step closer to normalizing the use of preferred pronouns.  

As previously mentioned, listing your preferred pronouns will also help you find an inclusive workplace by weeding out those who aren’t. 

Most companies that are allies share their diversity, inclusivity and equitability practices online and are likely on their website, social media accounts and shared by employees. Job seekers can consider scoping LinkedIn to see whether employees at your desired employer provide their preferred pronouns and names. Seeing information sharing like this can signal whether an employer is a safe place for all.

No matter the case, it will always be in your best interest to find an organization that supports you for who you are.